The Evening News: An Advent Sonnet

Ever wonder about “Christi Aduentu” (Advent of Christ) and its significance for Christians? The Latin term adventus is a translation from the Greek form parousia, which refers to the Second Coming of Christ. In the Western Christian tradition, observations of Advent encompass three primary forms: 1) to celebrate the birth and Nativity of Jesus at Christmas; 2) to celebrate Christ in one’s heart in daily devotion and prayer; and 3) to acknowledge Christ’s coming in glory at the end of the age.  Advent ceremonies in churches encourage a season of corporate worship and shared expectations, sometimes acknowledging a corporate desire for readiness at the Second Coming of Christ.

The Advent season typically includes a wreath of candles, one of which is lit to celebrate the opening of the season, in conjunction with the reading of Scripture, devotional time, and prayers. Another candle is lit on each subsequent Sunday. Some wreaths include a fifth candle representing Jesus, which is lit on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day.

In the Book of Revelation, sometimes referred to as “apocalyptic, prophetic,” or “epistolary literature,” the Apostle John composed a broad range of prophetic visions written in figurative language, which begins by addressing the Seven Churches of Asia, and the book reaches a crescendo (of sorts) in the Second Coming of Christ.

Revelation is a mysterious book, and especially the enigmatic passage in which Jesus appears on a white horse. This passage mentions several names of the Savior, and it is enveloped in figurative (sometimes cryptic) language. It appears to represent the Second Coming of Jesus:

Now I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse. And He who sat on him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness He judges and makes war. His eyes were like a flame of fire, and on His head were many crowns. He had a name written that no one knew except Himself. He was clothed with a robe dipped in blood, and His name is called The Word of God. And the armies in heaven, clothed in fine linen, white and clean, followed Him on white horses. Now out of His mouth goes a sharp sword, that with it He should strike the nations. And He Himself will rule them with a rod of iron. He Himself treads the winepress of the fierceness and wrath of Almighty God. And He has on His robe and on His thigh a name written:

KING OF KINGS AND
LORD OF LORDS (Revelation 19:11-16, NKJV).

I’ll attempt to unpack this passage with my own verse in “The Evening News,” which is very good news.

 

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Twain Hearts

This is a recent picture (taken in March of 2017) of me and my lovely wife on the dance floor, and in honor of God making the most perfect match for me, I have written a new sonnet titled “Twain Hearts.”
So here’s to God, “the best maker of all marriages . . .” Guys, God has never created “a perfect woman,” but never doubt that He can create the perfect woman for you. I hope you enjoy “Twain Hearts.”

Beatitude of Love

Have you ever said something to someone you love which, later you came to know, caused injury and grievous pain? I’m guilty. At the time I didn’t have a clue. And when it resurfaced I thought it was rather trivial and expressed it as such, which caused more pain. Guilty again!

Oftentimes we don’t realize the profundity of the things we say in our interactions with other people. I have said things to my wife in the past that have caused her great harm. In our 12 years of marriage, we have walked through the coals, as it were, with regard to how hurtful we can be to each other. I take 100 percent of the blame for this. I’m thankful that I have a forgiving wife.

I composed a sonnet which is influenced by several people and biblical perspectives: my wife, five wise men (accountability partners with whom I have close relationships), one of whom, Jim Rose, preached a sermon that influenced this sonnet (titled Blind Spots), and 1 Corinthians 13, also known as “The Love chapter.” By the way, Jim’s sermon will provide you with godly tools that provide compunction and healing in these situations.

I hope you appreciate Beatitude of Love.

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Gourmet Fare: A Marriage Proposal

There are a myriad of ways a man will pop the big question to his fiancé. Asking your special lady for her hand in marriage should not be so complicated, so why do men go to great lengths for the most exclusive, exciting, romantic, or bizarre proposal? I “get it.” It is a special event, and let’s face it, this is something you want to do once in a lifetime. You want it to be memorable and romantic and beautiful, and maybe even spectacular!

That’s how I envisioned it. So I wrote a proposal sonnet and presented it, along with the ring, in what I thought was the perfect place and time. But my timing was a bit off. I realize now what I didn’t know then: We hadn’t known each other long enough or well enough. After meeting her objections (I was sweating it), she accepted my proposal. Approximately 7 months later, we married. That was 11 years ago.

If I had to do it again, I would be more patient. Timing is everything, and that’s the only advice I can offer. Patience.

For you guys who want it to be special, you may want to check out the “58 Most Romantic Ways to Propose” on the Knot website. I recommend making your marriage proposal romantic, memorable, and prudent–something you and your bride-to-be will cherish for a lifetime.

My proposal sonnet is titled “Gourmet Fare.” It is the forerunner to the best day of my life, when I married my lovely bride, Dawn Hamilton Lindsey–a day which is much more memorable than proposal day. Continue reading to see it. Thanks for visiting today!

-dbl

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The Neuveau (“Stepford”) Wife’s Husband’s Tale

The dirty diapers, kids, and household chores,

They never cease, laundry piles up high,

It’s work from dusk ‘til dawn; what’s more,

A modern wife like me will never cry.

 

Lord knows we couldn’t have a happy home

Without my spouse’s friends: the drugs and booze

He loves, the deities upon his throne,

Including me, with whom he loves to schmooze.

 

But years ago, before I left this home

My life was tough: I cried and cried.

But heart once flesh is now a heart of stone,

For hubby bartered for a nouveau bride.

 

He pours contempt upon the Lord of Life,

And takes his pleasure from his cyber wife.