Anishinaabe

 

 

 


Anishinaabe

My name is "Anishinaabe," created 
from nothing interesting,
until Gitche Manitou cut out my heart, 
gave me a new one,
and now I walk a straight path.   
I was spontaneously selected
by Gitche's mercy and grace
for life abundant, 
but I rebel against it.
I don't know why.

I have a murderous heart,
a tongue of fire,
and a desire to steal Gitche's glory, 
but I want to make him smile,
and I don't know why.

He breathed new life 
into my loathsome soul,
purges my offenses,
and loves me completely,
but why?

He adopted me into his family,
and I call him "Abba,"
daddy, and I'm his child,
and he will never leave me.
This I know that I know that I know,
and I consent to it.     



 


 

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Jesus Blows Nic’s Mind

Nicodemus Is Blown Away

Nicodemus, a Pharisee, a member of the Sanhedrin, a learned teacher of the law, and a ruler of the Jews, has a divine appointment. Under the cover of darkness he visits Jesus to ask a crucial question, which he asks in the form of a statement: “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.” Jesus’ answer turns him inside-out: “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.”

Nicodemus cannot comprehend “Born again.” Dr. John Hayden explains in Word From the Word: Jesus uses a word with a double meaning. When He says, “You must be born again” He was actually saying, “You must be born from above.”

But “born again” and “born from above” mean the same thing. Moot point. But I understand Nicodemus’ confusion. Double-entendres can be confusing.

This divine dialogue continues throughout John 3:2-14, and at precisely the right moment, Jesus compares the Holy Spirit to the wind. It is a mind blowing read. And just think, If the Holy Spirit quickens Nicodemus’ spirit (or yours, for that matter), wouldn’t you be blown away?

Nicodemus appears two more times in the New Testament: after the Crucifixion he provides embalming spices for Jesus’ body, and a little while later he helps Joseph of Arimathea prepare Jesus’s body for the burial tomb.

I leave you with Like the Wind, a mind-numbing haiku for you today.

-dbl

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Two Poems by Connor Rose

Mr. Lindsey, AKA King Henry V & Connor Rose, AKA the Duke of Athens, Sir Theseus (an honorable Knight).

In my 2018 literature class we put on a Medieval feast (with everybody in costume) to celebrate the end of the school year. We had a fantastic time jousting, acting like barbarians, and gorging ourselves on turkey legs and ancient recipes passed down from The Wife of Bath, Beowulf, Macbeth, and other motley characters.

Last year in Ancient Literature, one of my students, Connor, wrote a poem titled “Up the Mast,” rhyming couplets, which was inspired by our reading of Odysseus’ spectacular exploits in The Odyssey.

This year Connor attended my Medieval Literature course, in which he was inspired to write a couple more poems: “Running Through the Forest,” inspired whilst reading The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood; and “When Sin Runs Rampant” is a work Connor composed while we were studying The Divine Comedy.

I hope you enjoy the work of Connor Rose, a young man of intellectual deftness, sensibility, and exceptional artistry.

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