Like the Wind

Nicodemus helping to take down Jesus’ body from the cross (Pietà, by Michelangelo).

Nicodemus Is Blown Away

Nicodemus, a Pharisee, a member of the Sanhedrin, a learned teacher of the law, and a ruler of the Jews, has a divine appointment. Under the cover of darkness, he visits Jesus to ask a crucial question, which he asks in the form of a statement: “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.” Jesus’ answer turns him inside-out: “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.”

Nicodemus cannot comprehend “Born again.” Dr. John Hayden explains in Word From the Word: Jesus uses a word with a double meaning. When He says, “You must be born again” He was actually saying, “You must be born from above.”

But “born again” and “born from above” mean the same thing. It is a moot point. I understand Nicodemus’ confusion. Double-entendres are confusing.

This divine dialogue continues throughout John 3:2-14, and at precisely the right moment, Jesus compares the Holy Spirit to the wind.

It is a mind blowing read. And just think, If the Holy Spirit quickens Nicodemus’ spirit (or yours, or anybody’s), wouldn’t you be blown away? I was when it happened to me.

Nicodemus appears two more times in the New Testament: after the Crucifixion he provides embalming spices for Jesus’ body, and a little while later he helps Joseph of Arimathea prepare Jesus’s body for the burial tomb.

I leave you with Like the Wind, a mind-numbing haiku about regeneration of the soul, and if you’re not quickened by the Spirit, I hope it happens for you one day.

-dbl

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In Perpetuum

What does that mean, “In Perpetuum”? It is something that will go on forever. See links below for a reference to (and an example of) the best way we can live our lives.   Continue reading

Two Poems by Connor Rose

Mr. Lindsey, AKA King Henry V & Connor Rose, AKA the Duke of Athens, Sir Theseus (an honorable Knight).

In my 2018 literature class we put on a Medieval feast (with everybody in costume) to celebrate the end of the school year. We had a fantastic time jousting, acting like barbarians, and gorging ourselves on turkey legs and ancient recipes passed down from The Wife of Bath, Beowulf, Macbeth, and other motley characters.

Last year in Ancient Literature, one of my students, Connor, wrote a poem titled “Up the Mast,” rhyming couplets, which was inspired by our reading of Odysseus’ spectacular exploits in The Odyssey.

This year Connor attended my Medieval Literature course, in which he was inspired to write a couple more poems: “Running Through the Forest,” inspired whilst reading The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood; and “When Sin Runs Rampant” is a work Connor composed while we were studying The Divine Comedy.

I hope you enjoy the work of Connor Rose, a young man of intellectual deftness, sensibility, and exceptional artistry.

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Pavlov’s Dog

Photo courtesy of Molly Lindsey

             

Who Is Pavlov’s Dog?

For starters, do you know about Pavlov?  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849 – 1936) was a Russian born physiologist known for his work in classical conditioning. His work has greatly influenced our understanding of human behavior and learning processes, and he continues to influence the formation of modern behavior therapy.

His contributions have influenced a broad spectrum of fields, from psychology and physiology, to medicine and philosophy, but in popular culture he is well known for his “conditioned reflex” experiments with dogs. Various stimuli would be presented as an antecedent to feeding time, and the dogs would then become conditioned to salivate upon the stimuli presented before food was actually presented.

Hence, the image (above) of my Australian Shepherd, Molly, licking her chops. All we have to do is mention “treat, snack, breakfast, lunch, or supper,” and she begins licking her lips. The other day it made me wonder who Pavlov’s dog was, but then I discovered, he had many dogs! Duh!

Oh well . . . Pavlov and Molly conspired to make me think about who Pavlov’s dog was, which inspired a poem. I hope you enjoy “Pavlov’s Dog.”

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